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On Newton's Lantern

From David Lister to Laura Rozenberg

Dear Laura,

I'm sorry to be so long in replying to you. I am absolutely snowed under with things I must do at present and am finding it difficult to get my head above water.

I felt I should send a note about Newton's Lantern.

I read the posting from Brian K. Webb and I tried to access the book he referred to at the end of his e-mail. it refused to load on my computer. Have you had any more success?

I suspect that  Newton's Lantern is known about only by repute and that not description of it (still less, folding instructions) exist. It's not ths sort of thing people of that age recorded in detail. In his diary, Samuel Pepys mentions a paper basket that someone ( I think, a maid) had folded, but no description of folding instructions are given. But it does indicate that in England at that time thee were paperfolded items that have been virtually forgotten about. We must just keep our eyes open until something chances to come our way.

I am, in fact somewhat devoted to Isaac Newton. He was born near Grantham, which is in the County of Lincolnshire, in which I also live. Grantham is about fifty miles away from here. I regret that I have never been able to visit Newton;s birthplace and see the tree frwhich the apple fell. (Not on his head apparently!)

Newton was also a member of the same University, Cambridge, as myself, although my college was not the same as his. He was a member of Trinity College, whereas my college, Downing, did not exist in his day. One cannot but admire Newton's great leaps of vision . I often think of him standing by the shore of a great ocean and picking up the odd pebble here and there. I like that metaphor and feel the same way about things I investigate..

I will write again later about the Yoshizawa models from "Homemaker" magazine. I can say, however, that I have never come across this before.

Sincere greetings,

David Lister
November 23, 2012

   
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